About Us

Please note that the content presented on this website is for informational purposes only. Neither the website’s publisher, writers, or subject matter experts provide any medical advice. When dealing with insecticides, the label is the law–incorrect application can have serious health consequences or be illegal.

Helpful, Proven Solutions to Cockroach Problems

It may seem strange to find a website entirely about cockroaches. But when you find you have a cockroach problem, you want specific answers. You also want to be sure those answers can help.

We publish content to help you eliminate cockroaches from your life—and with them, the embarrassment, shame, and frustration that these creatures can sometimes make you feel.

To achieve that, we’re committed to doing a few things right:

  • Creating content that’s well-written and easy to understand.
  • Offering solutions that are safe, simple, and effective.
  • Providing information that’s current, topical, and scientifically-accurate.

To deliver on those goals, we thoroughly research and cite each article we publish, clarify concepts with custom illustrations, and have our content reviewed for accuracy and usefulness by experts in entomology (the study of insects) and IPM (Integrated Pest Management). You can read more about our team and science editors below.


Publisher

Andrew Martin

Andrew Martin

Publisher/Writer

Andrew’s father was an exterminator and amateur entomologist who, besides teaching his kids a love for bugs, wanted to make a website about them some day.

Though “some day” never quite happened for his dad, it eventually did for Andrew and his daughter who created Cockroachfacts.com in 2019. What began with interesting cockroach facts for kids, evolved into a source of helpful pest control information.

You can drop Andrew a note to say “hello” here.


Science Editors

Rae Osborn, PhD.

Rae Osborn, PhD.

Science Editor

Dr. Rae Osborn was educated in South Africa and the United States. She holds Honors Bachelor of Science degrees in Zoology and Entomology, and a Master of Science in Entomology from the University of Natal in South Africa.

She received a PhD in Quantitative Biology from the University of Texas at Arlington, where her research was in Entomology. She also has an AAS Degree in Information Network Specialist and an AAS in Computer Information Systems from Bossier Parish Community College in Louisiana.

Her skills lie in research, writing, editing and teaching Biology for a range of educational levels. She has experience as a writer, researcher and as a college teacher, and is currently working as a freelance writer and editor.

Her accomplishments include receiving tenure and being promoted to Associate Professor of Biology in the United States and publishing papers on Entomology in peer-reviewed journals.

She is also a professional reviewer for Advances in Entomology journal. Her hometown is Pietermaritzburg in South Africa where her main interest is in Entomology and Ornithology, and her hobby is bird watching. She has published articles online at http://www.differencebetween.net/author/rae/ and https://en.lifeder.com/author/rae-osborn/

James Miksanek, PhD

James Miksanek, PhD.

Science Editor

James is an entomologist and adjunct professor of biology. His background is in biological control, and he has a passion for ecology and environmental science. His research has addressed a variety of topics including pest control and the management of invasive species.

Since he was six years old, James wanted to be an entomologist. He used to catch grasshoppers and butterflies in his backyard, and was always the first one to explore a new area in the hopes of discovering an exciting new creature. In college, James helped manage a colony of Madagascar hissing roaches used to help grade schoolers learn about bugs in a fun, hands-on way.

As a hobby, James loves being involved in insect education and public outreach. He enjoys reading and reviewing everything from children’s books to academic papers, and his office is filled with field guides, insect nets, and boxes full of beetles, butterflies, and wasps.